Back to Back Disability Conferences: NOSSCR & ADA

Dear Gimpy Law Readers:

I am attending two conferences to better serve the disability community. I just finished attending NOSSCR, a bi-annual conference on Social Security law, and am currently attending the National ADA Symposium. Interestingly, the definition of “disability” is harder to meet under Social Security than under the ADA.

NOSSCR/ADA Conference logos

NOSSCR/ADA Conference logos

I realize that I haven’t posted in a while. I faced setbacks to officially launching my law practice, Disability Law Collective. In particular, I was figuring out office accessibility at my incubator program. There seems to be a fine line when advocating for yourself in an employment-esque context. I also had to think about my clients and future attorneys with disabilities in my program.

Anyway, I will write an actual blog soon. If you want to see a blog on a particular topic, please comment below.

Civil Rights Conference & ABA TECHSHOW

This week, I will be attending Chicago-Kent College of Law’s Section 1983 Civil Rights Conference and the American Bar Association’s (ABA) TECHSHOW. I’d love meeting up with you if you will be there. Below are more information on both events:

Chicago-Kent College of Law’s Section 1983 Civil Rights Conference

Section 1983 Civil Rights Litigation Conference: Liability arising out of §1983 presents a continuing challenge for all municipal lawyers, private practitioners, and litigators who try cases in this dynamic area. Keeping up with this ever-changing environment is critical. In this two-day conference, you will learn both the fundamentals and more advanced aspects of §1983 practice and trial skills, and analyze the latest judicial decisions. Visit the program website for more information.

American Bar Association’s (ABA) TECHSHOW

The ABA TECHSHOW Conference and EXPO is where lawyers, legal professionals, and technology all come together. For three days, attendees learn about the most useful and practical technologies available. Our variety of CLE programming offers a great deal of education in just a short amount of time.

Attending the Access to Law Initiative Incubator Conference.

I’m attending the Access to Law Initiative Incubator Conference. I’d love to connect with you if you’re there!

ALI Incubator Conference

“The rapid growth of incubator and residency programs over the past 2 years is proof that good ideas spread fast. Law schools, Legal Aid programs and bar associations across the United States, and now the world, are assuming an increasing role in the development of post-graduate training and support programs for attorneys wishing to establish solo and small firms or not-for-profit organizations. Inherent in these programs is a focus on training lawyers who can help to resolve the unmet legal needs of individuals and entities from moderate to low-income communities while they build economically sustainable practices that will continue to serve those client needs.

These incubator and residency programs are expanding rapidly and reflect the fact that increasingly the people who choose to attend law school do so because they are committed to expanding access to affordable legal services for the mainstream groups that have not been adequately served, and because they recognize that solo and small firm practice has long been the most popular career path for lawyers.

This conference addresses the opportunities and challenges institutions face in the conceptualization, design and implementation of successful incubators and residency programs.”

Find more information about the ALI Incubator Conference at https://www.cwsl.edu/incubator.

Attorney Profile: Disclosing My Disability

After much deliberation about disclosing my disability on my online attorney profile, I decided to go full monty and disclose a full picture. Perhaps it makes sense for me to disclose my disability, since I am starting a disability law practice. But I am still nervous that some potential clients would be hesitant to hire me because of my disability.

When I was about to graduate law school, I had a conversation about disclosing my disability with my Employment Discrimination Law Professor. She encouraged me to disclose my disability, saying that employers would eventually find out that I have a disability and that I shouldn’t waste my time with the ones that discriminate. She added that I would find the right office that would accept me and my disability. After about six years of agonizing job applications, I have come to realize that no such office exists. But I am hopeful that my potential clients will be different.

Here’s my blurb for my up and coming website for my law practice:

Profile Picture of Esther Lee

Profile Picture of Esther Lee

My name is Esther S. Lee.  I am an attorney with a disability.  My Cerebral Palsy affects my speech and mobility, but not my spirit.  I received honors distinctions from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with a B.A. in English and Rhetoric.  I graduated from the University of California Davis, School of Law, with a focus on civil rights and public interest law.  In addition to being an attorney, I am starting a non-profit housing cooperative for people with and without disabilities, called Able Community.  My extensive background advancing the rights of people with disabilities includes legal work at multiple disability rights organizations and disability policy work at the White House.  I am committed to empowering people with disabilities and underrepresented communities, advancing their rights and quality of life through legal advocacy.

Our office is an affordable, socially conscious law practice advocating for people with disabilities and their families’ every day legal needs.  The practice focuses on Social Security, Special Education, housing, disability, and administrative law; as well as advancing the Civil Rights of all people in Illinois and California.

Experience:

  • Successfully fought apartment management companies and university housing to modify units for increased ADA accessibility.
  • Successfully initiated Social Security applications and assisted with appearances.
  • Successfully resolved fence encroachment matters between neighbors.
  • Successfully reduced and appealed Cook County property tax assessments.
  • Successfully negotiated medical bills in a medical negligence case.
  • Successfully completed mediations, administrative reviews, administrative fair hearings, 4731 complaints for Regional Center disabilities services in California.
  • Successfully completed mediations and administrative review process for Department of Rehabilitation services.

Pro Bono Experience:

  • White House: Engaged in disability policy and outreach to the disability community.
  • Legal Assistance Foundation’s Special Education Pro Bono Panel: Trained to provide legal representation and advocacy in Special Education matters.
  • Access Living—Civil Rights Team (Chicago’s Independent Living Center): Advanced disability rights in housing and community integration litigation.
  • Disability Rights California’s Office of Clients’ Rights Advocates: Advocated for clients with developmental disabilities in Special Education, employment discrimination, and wrote a letter to stop harassing a client who was manipulated into purchasing an expensive household item he did not need.
  • Aids Legal Council of Chicago: Advocated for adults and children with disabilities in Social Security Disability Insurance and Social Security Income appeals before the Social Security Administration and Federal Court.
  • Legal Services of Northern California: Provided legal advice to low-income and elderly clients on topics including landlord-tenant issues, housing, and professional licensing.
  • Coordinated Advice and Referral Program for Legal Services (CARPLS): Assisted clients in creditor, housing, and family law self-help matters on a legal assistance hotline.
  • Civil Rights Clinic: Represented a former prisoner in a medical negligence (personal injury) case against prison personnel.
  • Homeless Action Center: Worked on Social Security applications and appeals for homeless and low income individuals.

Any feedback on this bio or thoughts on disclosing one’s disability on one’s profile?

The non-profit I’m starting, Able Community, needs your help!

Dear Gimpy Law Readers,

I wanted to share about the non-profit I’m starting, Able Community. Watch this video, then read the e-mail below to find out more!

Able Community is building the first fully accessible, affordable, and intentionally inclusive cooperative housing for people with and without disabilities in the United States. Beginning this holiday season, we are asking for your help! Please consider donating to Able Community’s Every Dollar Counts campaign, our very first fundraiser.

It is extremely difficult for people with disabilities to find affordable and accessible housing, and personal care, which affects our independence and employability. Able Community is creating an alternative to institutions and living with family for people with disabilities, while improving personal assistants’ quality of life and compensation. Our members will run and operate this collaborative housing cooperative and personal care services to meet these unmet independent living needs. We will be located in Chicago, because of its employment potential and accessible public transit, with approximately 20 various sized apartment units, some offices, and shared common space for people with disabilities, personal care assistants, and their families.

All of Able Community members have disabilities and/or work with persons with disabilities, so we are passionate about the need for this innovative solution and we have creative ideas about how to accomplish it. We have been meeting weekly, investigated the lack of other living situations, drafted our founding documents, and are in the process of incorporating.

In order to make the Able Community a reality, we are raising $800 to incorporate as a non-profit and for our website. We need YOUR help; a donation of $10, $25, or $50 will help us get there. With your support, Able Community’s housing co-op will become a reality.

Every dollar will have a meaningful impact on our work doing—redefining independence for people with disabilities. Able Community believes that Every Dollar Counts. Instead of sending a Christmas card or buying us a cup of coffee, contribute a few dollars to our cause and contribute to changing lives – and ultimately the disability community – forever.

To find out more and donate online, go to AbleCommunityChicago.Org, click on the donate link below, or make a check payable to Able Community. It would be helpful if you have a PayPal account, but we welcome donations in any method.

Thank you in advance for your support of Able Community!

 

Happy Holidays,

Gimpy Law Blogger, on behalf of Able Community.

donate

Michael Brown: Civil Rights and Racial Justice for All

This post seems relevant to the recent Ferguson protests in response to the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case.

Gimpy Law

Michael Brown Michael Brown’s picture in his graduation cap and gown, holding his Normandy High School diploma, from this online article.

Darren Wilson, has been named as the police officer who shot Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, on August 9, 2014. This shooting occurred 2 years, 5 months, and 14 days after an unarmed, teenaged Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch coordinator. Unfortunately, this scenario has become commonplace; an African American being subjected to police brutality, excessive force, and even death.

Perhaps this is why 42 U.S.C. § 1983, referred to as “Section 1983,” which is part of the Civil Rights Act of 1871, is still in use today. Section 1983 allows governmental actors, including police officers, to be liable for damages, declaratory, or injunctive relief for violating a citizen’s rights, such as the Freedom from Excessive Force under the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments. Sadly, this legislation, also known as the “Ku Klux…

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